2023-2024 Early College Scholars Program Courses: Fall and Spring Semesters

Course Information

Courses are taught by Washington University instructors which include faculty, graduate students, post docs, and adjuncts from across campus disciplines and research fields including humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and mathematics. These courses are undergraduate courses offered by the College of Arts & Sciences. Priority for enrollment in fall and spring semesters goes first to full-time, degree seeking students. If space is available, then pre-college students may be approved to enroll.

These courses are given over 16 weeks. Courses may include lectures, discussions, and group work. Students should expect any combination of daily assignments, readings, exams, quizzes, papers, and presentations. For every hour spent in class, students should expect at least two hours of work outside of class. Students should expect that some examinations, where attendance is required, will be given in the evenings.

Students may enroll in no more than two 3-unit credit courses. Courses meet in person and attendance at all classes is required.

About Course Listings

These course listings are subject to change and cancellation without notice. A student must meet any prerequisites listed for the course to be approved to enroll. Registration is processed on a first-come, first-serve basis. We do not hold spots in courses for pre-college students. Not all courses offered by the College of Arts & Sciences are open for pre-college students to enroll. If you have questions about course offerings, please contact us at precollege@wustl.edu.

When available, a previous year's syllabus is included in each individual description. Instructors do not remain the same every semester. You should expect similar content, but readings and assignments can vary. 

Course Materials

Students can visit the Campus Bookstore to view and purchase books online. Textbook information is typically posted 2 weeks before the class start date. Don’t be alarmed if a textbook isn’t listed for a course. Some instructors don’t use textbooks or will wait to share textbook information with students until the first day of classes. Instructors will also share course materials via Canvas, WashU's learning management system. 

Fall 2023 Courses

August 28-December 20, 2023

Students interested in enrolling in fall courses should submit a registration form with signed parent liability waiver and release and a copy of their transcript to our office by August 14, 2023. We will begin reviewing fall registration requests on July 3, 2023 and processing requests July 21, 2023.

REGISTRATION FOR THE 2023 FALL SEMESTER HAS CLOSED.

Spring 2024 Courses

January 16-May 8, 2024

Students interested in enrolling in spring courses should submit a registration form with signed parent liability waiver and release and a copy of their transcript to our office by January 1, 2024.

Registration for the 2024 Spring Semester has closed.

Calculus II (L24 132)

A brief review of the definite integral and Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Techniques of integration, applications of the integral, sequences and series, and some material on differential equations. Prerequisite: One year of high school calculus with a grade of B or better. 

This course requires an enrollment in a lecture three days a week and a discussion section once a week.

  • Lecture times: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays 9:00-9:50am, 10:00-10:50am, or 1:00-1:50pm 
  • Discussion times: Thursdays 8:00-8:50am, 9:00-9:50am, 10:00-10:50am, 11:00-11:50am, 12:00-12:50pm, or 1:00-1:50pm 

Update 11/16/23: 10:00am lecture is full and is not accepting waits.

Differential Equations (L24 217)

Introduction to ordinary differential equations: first-order equations, linear equations, systems of equations, series solutions, Laplace transform methods, numerical solutions. Prerequisite: Calculus II (AP Calculus BC) with a grade of B or better. 

This course requires an enrollment in a lecture three days a week and a discussion section once a week.

  • Lecture times: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays 9:00-9:50am or 10:00-10:50am 
  • Discussion times: Thursdays 8:00-8:50am, 9:00-9:50am, 10:00-10:50am, 11:00-11:50am, or 12:00-12:50pm

Update 11/16/23: 10:00am lecture is full and is not accepting waits. 10:00am and 12:00pm discussion sessions are also full and not accepting waits.

Calculus III (L24 233)

Differential and integral calculus of functions of two and three variables. Vectors, curves and surfaces in space, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line integrals, vector calculus through Green's Theorem. Prerequisite: Calculus II (AP Calculus BC) with a grade of B or better. 

This course requires an enrollment in a lecture three days a week and a discussion section once a week.

  • Lecture times: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays 9:00-9:50am,11:00-11:50am, 12:00-12:50pm or 4:00-4:50pm
  • Discussion times: Tuesdays 8:00-8:50am, 9:00-9:50am, 10:00-10:50am, 11:00-11:50am, 12:00-12:50pm, or 1:00-1:50pm 

Update 11/16/23: 9:00am and 11:00am lectures are full and not accepting waits. Only 8:00am, 10:00am, and 11:00am discussion sections have space available.

Matrix Algebra (L24 309)

An introductory course in linear algebra that focuses on Euclidean n-space, matrices and related computations. Topics include: systems of linear equations, row reduction, matrix operations, determinants, linear independence, dimension, rank, change of basis, diagonalization, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, orthogonality, symmetric matrices, least square approximation, quadratic forms. Introduction to abstract vector spaces. Prerequisite: Calculus II (AP Calculus BC) with a grade of B or better. 

This course requires an enrollment in a lecture three days a week.

  • Lecture times: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays 9:00-9:50am,12:00-12:50pm, or 1:00-1:50pm

Update 11/17/23: 12:00pm and 1:00pm sections are full and not accepting waits.

Foundations for Higher Mathematics (L24 310)

An introduction to the rigorous techniques used in advanced mathematics. Topics include basic logic, set theory, methods of proof and counterexamples, foundations of mathematics, construction of number systems, counting methods, combinatorial arguments and elementary analysis. Prerequisite: Calculus III with a grade of B or better.

This course requires an enrollment in a lecture two to three days a week.

  • Lecture times:
  • Section 01: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 1:00-1:50pm
  • Section 02: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:30am-12:50pm

Introduction to Psychology (L33 100B)

A survey and analysis of concepts, theory, and research covering the areas of biological psychology, human development, learning, memory, social psychology, and mental disorders and their treatment.. This is a general survey course designed to introduce students to the diversity of areas, approaches, and theories that comprise the study of mind and behavior. Prerequisite: None. 

This course requires an enrollment in a lecture three days a week.

  • Lecture times: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays 10:00-10:50am or 12:00-12:50pm

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (L48 160B)

This course introduces the basic concepts, theories, and methods of Cultural Anthropology - an academic discipline that studies the diversity of human cultures and societies. The purpose is to provide a broad perspective on the types of research that anthropologists undertake, and to engage in a critical dialogue on how the work of anthropologists contributes to understanding the human condition. Prerequisite: None. 

This course requires an enrollment in a lecture three days a week Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays 1:00-1:50pm

Update 11/16/23: This course is full and is not accepting registration requests.

Ancient Greek and Roman Medicine (L08 3801)

This course introduces students to the practice and theory of medicine in the ancient Mediterranean, beginning in Egypt and continuing through Greece and Rome. It ends in the Middle Ages. Greco-Roman medicine will be our focus. How was disease understood by practitioners and, as far as can be reconstructed, by laypeople? What form did surgical, pharmacological, and dietitic treatment take? What were the intellectual origins of Greek medicine? The social status of medical practitioners? How was medicine written and in what terms did its practitioners conceive it? Prerequisite: none

This course requires an enrollment in a lecture three days a week on MW and a discussion section once a week on Fridays all held 9:00-9:50am.

Greek Mythology (L08 301C)

The myths of ancient Greece are not only inherently interesting, but they are an incomparable starting point for the study of the ancient world, and they have offered numerous images and paradigms to poets, artists, and theorists. This course provides an introduction to the major Greek myths, their role in literature and art, their historical and social background, and ancient and modern approaches to their interpretation. Student work will include discussing course material in sections and online, taking two exams covering both the myths themselves and the ancient authors who represent our richest sources, and writing several essays interpreting or comparing ancient literary treatments. Prerequisites: none.

This course requires an enrollment in a lecture three days a week on MW and a discussion section once a week on Fridays all held 1:00-1:50pm.

World Languages (Spanish, French, Chinese, Latin, and Japanese)

Students interested in world language courses should contact our office at precollege@wustl.edu to speak with an advisor about availability and placement exam process.

Other Courses

Priority for enrollment in fall and spring semesters is given first to full-time undergraduate students, and if space is available, then pre-college students may be permitted to enroll in select number of courses. From time to time, students may be interested in courses not included on this list. Students should contact our office at precollege@wustl.edu to speak with an advisor to discuss availability for courses not included above. 

Frequently Asked Questions

Will I have access to the library to study before or after class>

Yes. As part of your orientation tasks, you will need to get a student ID card which will allow you access to the library. You are welcome to study on campus before and after classes.

Do I have to enroll in courses year round?

No. The program is offered year round, but you do not have to enroll in courses year round. Many students choose to enroll in courses for only one semester.

Can I purchase food on campus?

Yes. All dining locations except credit/debit card payments for food purchases.